Doctors: Visits & Directory of State Medical Licensing

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Bobbie
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Doctors: Visits & Directory of State Medical Licensing

Postby Bobbie » Sun Sep 25, 2005 5:03 pm

Create your own medical form on the computer. (Use a copy from a doc.'s office and follow that format. It usually lists medical complaints, medications, surgeries, family information, contact & insurance info.)

This will save a lot of time and stress in the doctor's office. It can be changed for each specialist you see. When I get in the office, I look at their form, answer any questions not on my form, write my name and date at the top of their form, and staple the two together.

Most doctors like this, and if the admissions desk person (usually some l6-year old) objects, tell her firmly that all the information they need are on the form. Doctors seldom object to this. Besides why would he/she want to decipher handwriting -- we all know what their handwriting looks like! I give them the list for my file and take an updated list with each visit. I do my meds., health problems, and drug cautions in different colors on the form.

I also make a list of my questions on the computer. I make two copies, and give one to the doctor. I refer to the other and jot answers to questions on it so I have a written record later.
Last edited by Bobbie on Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:02 pm, edited 7 times in total.
Reason: Updating

Bobbie
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Personal Experience

Postby Bobbie » Mon Sep 26, 2005 11:25 am

Make a list of questions (doublespaced) to ask the doctor (short and organized) and have two copies. Give one to the doctor and keep one for yourself. Write down the answers on your copy.

One caution: many doctors' office schedule your visits for 15 minutes so make the best use of these 15 minutes. This seems to apply more to specialists -- who usually see you as a "part" -- than an internist or family practice doctor who looks at the whole person. Of course, it varies by doctors. I've been ushered out in 15 minutes by a family practice doctor, and had a pulmonologist spend an hour with me. My favorite (?) doctor is the one who goes to the door at the end of the 15 minutes and rattles the door knob indicating, "I am a busy person." In some practices, the docs don't get their "big bonus" unless they have a certain head count of patients.

Get everything you want answered "up front." Avoid personal "chit chat" (usually called the "warming up period") until the end. Think "What do I want to get out of this visit?"
Last edited by Bobbie on Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

Bobbie
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Postby Bobbie » Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:13 am

Rose2 posted these hints.

Posted: Tue Feb 07, 2006

Having working in a medical setting for many years I can say that 1) it is not uncommon for patients and family members to come away from meetings with their doctor with very different impressions of what was said than what was actually said (this is probably true about everything in life because we have our own filters of how we perceive things), and, 2) medical records do not always accurately reflect what happened during a particular appt.

That said, if you have any notation in your medical records that IBD was discussed (and just because it might have been discussed, it does mean you have it, only that it was discussed, perhaps as something to rule out), you should follow up to get clear on that point rather than making any assumptions.

Getting the right diagnosis (of which there can also be more than one) is crucial for any illness so you can get the right treatment(s).

My recommendation is ALWAYS, if after leaving your doctor's office, you find you have questions or realize you didn't understand everything that was explained (all of which is very common for patients to experience), call the doctor to follow up. One approach I've found to be helpful is to type out my questions and concerns and to fax it to the doctor. That way, if they call and you're not in, they can at least get started by talking to your voicemail. Speaking of which, make sure if you do send a fax asking for a call back that you tell them it's ok to leave a detailed message on your voicemail. Because of confidentialitity laws, they may not do so without your permission.

Another thing you can always do is request a copy of your medical records. Sometimes, if you only need to see one or two of the most recent reports, the doctor's nurse may be willing to just print them out for you and send them to you.

Bobbie
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Postby Bobbie » Wed Feb 08, 2006 3:17 am

CindyM recommends getting copies of everything you can, especially all lab work and other tests.
Last edited by Bobbie on Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Updating

Bobbie
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Getting a Doc. Appointment Earlier

Postby Bobbie » Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:54 pm

If one appointment scheduler doesn't have an appointment, call again and a different scheduler might be able to book an appointment. (Most offices have frequent cancellations or can "work you in." ) Ask if they have a "wait list." If not, call every day or so. Be persistant but courteous.

Bobbie
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Re: Doctors: Visits & Directory of State Medical Licensing

Postby Bobbie » Wed Mar 30, 2011 12:08 pm

Always get copies of any procedures/lab work you have done. Even though these are now usually computized, you might need "proof positive" if you change doctors.

Since having C. diff. I've developed muliple heath issues (some are probably C. diff. related - some are not). I have recurrent UTI's and IC. I've on a preventative dose of Macrobid (50 mg) (and a steroid cream) but sometimes still have UTI symptoms. Several weeks ago, I went in for a culture, and the initial diagnosis was "multiple bacteria and white blood cells -- urinary tract infection." I was on Macrobid at the regular dosage (200 mg) unti the culture came back. When it did, it showed I did not have a UTI. (I also asked my uro. to look at the results -- he is associated with the same practice.) I got copies of everything.

Bottom line. Tests are not always accurate. Always get a printed copy. It is your right as a patient.

Bobbie
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Re: Doctors: Visits & Directory of State Medical Licensing

Postby Bobbie » Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:21 pm

JoElizabeth gave us this info.

You can rate your doctor or look up the rating on doctors. Go to http://www.ratemds.com.
Last edited by Bobbie on Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: updating


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